Repentance and remission of sins considered: or An inquiry concerning repentance.
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Repentance and remission of sins considered: or An inquiry concerning repentance. from the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. Addressed, I. To the author of a pamphlet, intituled, "Divine glory in the condemnation of the ungodly." II. To all for whom Christ died.

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Published by Printed by Warden and Russell, for the author, and sold by him at his house in Cross-Street, at E. Battelle"s book-store, State Street, at Adams and Nourse"s office, Court Street, and by the publishers, at their office in Marlborough Street. in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Eckley, Joseph, -- 1750-1811.,
  • Future punishment.,
  • Repentance.,
  • Salvation.,
  • Universalism.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy Shippie Townsend. ; [Seven lines of Scripture texts]
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 18809.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination24 p.
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14591171M

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Repentance and remission of sins considered: or An inquiry concerning repentance.: from the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. Addressed, I. To the author of a pamphlet, intituled, "Divine glory in the condemnation of the ungodly." II. To all for whom Christ died. Repentance and remission of sins considered: or An inquiry concerning repentance. from the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. Addressed, I. To the author of a pamphlet, intituled, "Divine glory in the condemnation of the ungodly." II. To all for whom Christ died. / By Shippie Townsend. Repentance and remission of sins considered: or An inquiry concerning repentance. from the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. Addressed, I. To the author of a pamphlet, intituled, "Divine glory in the condemnation of the ungodly." II. To all for whom Christ died. / By Shippie Townsend. ; [Seven lines of Scripture texts]Author: Shippie Townsend. Having considered what sinners must repent of, we will next make some inquiry concerning those exercises and affections of heart which are implied in true repentance. These are sorrow, shame, self­condemnation, hatred of sin, and sincere purposes to forsake it and desires to be delivered from it. 1.

39 rows  A mortal sin (Latin: peccatum mortale), in Catholic theology, is a gravely sinful act, which . an inquiry concerning imputation. IT has been the opinion of many, that in order for guilty man to be justified through Christ, it is necessary that his righteousness should be imputed to them, so as to be a ground on which they may be considered righteous in law. The Articles of Faith were first written to a man by the name of John Wentworth. John was an editor of the Chicago Democrat. Joseph Smith, in reply to an inquiry concerning what the Church believed, wrote out thirteen points in a letter to the editor. This letter is now called the Wentworth Letter. Times. The centurion's servant healed. () The widow's son raised. () John the Baptist's inquiry concerning Jesus. () Christ anointed in the house of the Pharisee The parable of the two debtors. () Commentary on Luke (Read Luke ) Servants should study to .

On Repentance: I: The substance of the gospel is, not without reason, said to be comprised in “repentance and remission of sins.” Therefore, if these two points be omitted, every controversy concerning faith will be jejune and incomplete, and consequently of little use. The centurion's servant healed. () The widow's son raised. () John the Baptist's inquiry concerning Jesus. () Christ anointed in the house of the Pharisee The parable of the two debtors. () Servants should study to endear themselves to their masters. Masters ought to take particular care of their servants when they are sick. “A Question Concerning the Second Vatican Council” - by Verax. A treatise concerning repentance wherein also the doctrine.   While translating the Book of Mormon at Harmony, Pennsylvania, on , Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery became concerned about baptism for the remission of sins as described in 3 Nephi They went into the woods to pray for enlightenment.